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Trader Joe’s Organic Whole Green Figs

 

Trader Joe's Organic Whole Green Figs

Everything you want from a fig – except the texture.

Do you sometimes crave a whole green fig, but all the ones you find are either not organic, or not frozen rock solid? Well I have good news! Trader Joe’s is solving both of your problems at once with their frozen Organic Whole Green Figs!

The last time we looked at any of Trader Joe’s figs it was their Black Mission Figs, which I found pleasantly sweet and tasty, if you can get over the somewhat unnerving fleshiness of them. Well fleshiness isn’t a problem this time around, because they’re coming to you in the form of rock hard iceballs!

The first thing you’ll notice when you pick these figs up is that Trader Joe’s didn’t go looking for the small ones. Each fig in the bag is a hefty little monster, considerably larger than the fresh Black Mission Figs you might be able to find in the produce aisle. Apart from the size, these green figs (also called kadota figs) are somewhat less sweet than the black figs from before. That said, they’re still figs – which means they’re still quite sweet indeed, and have the same mushy-soft / crispy-seedy center that gives them such a unique bite.

We spent plenty of time reviewing the history of these meaty drupes last time, so I won’t bore you all again with a lecture on prehistoric agriculture. This time let’s take a look at the religious perspective.

As you might expect from a fruit man has had such a long history with (11,000 years+), religion has a good deal to say about figs – in particular considering that they’ve been cultivated widely through the that fertile belt of religion that begins around the Mediterranean and stretches all the way to South East Asia.  As such, all the big time religions feature figs in their holy books to a considerable degree.

Adam and Eve, for instance, sought to cover up their shame from God with the trusty old fig leaf – maybe not the best choice considering that figs are a notable skin allergens, and that the natural latex that the fig tree produces is a serious eye irritant. Nevertheless, thanks to A&E, fig leaves entered the art world for a pretty good stretch of centuries as the de facto tasteful genital cover in paintings and sculptures.

Meanwhile, in the religion of Islam, the fig is considered one of the two sacred trees, along with that other old favorite the olive. Going further we find that the historical Buddha went out and achieved enlightenment under the bodhi tree – otherwise known as the sacred fig tree –  and that the fig is even considered to be the “world tree” from which all springs in Hinduism. Even Jesus got in on the fig tree, when he chose to kill one in Mark 11:12 by cursing it to death for not bearing fruit. Harsh Jesus!

That’s a pretty good pedigree, the fig! But all that said, what reason do I really have to buy these things frozen?

Obviously, getting them fresh is always going to be your best option, but due to their high sugar content, figs ripen and spoil very quickly. A ripe fig will even split under the strain of it’s own sweet innards if left too long, so transporting the fresh produce is a considerably trickier prospect than, say, an apple.

If you’re feeling a hankering for figs, know that the frozen solution is not a perfect one. For starters, the figs seem to freeze inconsistently. In my bag, I found that three or four were somewhat mushy, even when the others were frozen solid – and that’s after a few days in the back of my freezer! These mushier figs didn’t seem to be bad necessarily, just soft. That said, you might want to feel around for a couple different bags to find one that’s perfectly hard and frozen.

If you want to enjoy your green figs right away, you can throw them in a blender and try out this tasty and quick smoothie recipe.

If you’d rather enjoy your figs thawed,  you’ll need to slowly defrost them in your fridge for a few hours. However, at this point be prepared for a shock. These defrosted figs are incredibly slimy and incredibly mushy. That’s simply an unavoidable aspect of the freezing process – and the price you’ll pay if you want figs you can defrost any time.

It’s somewhat off putting, and nowhere near as nice as handling actual fresh figs, but while the texture is somewhat compromised the taste is still the same.

If you can stand the wait to thaw these, and the softness, there are lots of great recipes that call for the refined sweetness of green figs.

Here’s one that I like, a rather laid back recipe for laid back times.

Fig, Arugula and Goat Cheese Flat Bread - straight out of the oven.

Fig, Arugula and Goat Cheese Flat Bread – straight out of the oven.

 


Fig, Arugula and Goat Cheese Flat Bread

Ingredients

  • 1 flat bread
  • 1 or 2 tsp olive oil
  • Some arugula
  • Some awesome goat cheese
  • Trader Joe’s Organic Green Figs (quartered)

Directions

  • Pre-heat your oven to 350 degrees.
  •  Paint the flat bread with olive oil, until it has a nice sheen.
  • Lay down a bed of arugula. On top of this add your (thawed) quartered, green figs and as much  goat cheese as you feel comfortable with.
  • Pop you prepared flat bread in the oven and heat until toasty. About 5-10 minutes
  • Enjoy the hell out of it with a few friends while discussing philosophy, the sunset, or Game of Thrones.

 


Note to you, the reader If you like this recipe, or want to see more, let me know! And feel free to share your notes on it in the comments.


 

The Breakdown:

Would I Recommend Them: I’d look for fresh figs first – but these are a good stand in.

Would I Buy Them Again: Sure, I really like that flat bread!

Final Synopsis: Not as good as getting your figs fresh, but more convenient.

Trader Joe's Organic Whole Green Figs - Nutrition Facts

Trader Joe’s Organic Whole Green Figs – Nutrition Facts

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11 Comments on “Trader Joe’s Organic Whole Green Figs”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Long time listener first time caller (or, you know), but: RECIPES! That would be awesome! Do that!
    I’m going to try your figgy version on my fresh naan and let you know, but sounds like a good way to use frozen figs (always a bit slimy) without pulverizing them to death into sweet drinks. Might make a nice marmalade with onion and coriander, as well.

  2. Saurs says:

    Long time listener first time caller (or, you know), but: RECIPES! That would be awesome! Do that!
    I’m going to try your figgy version on my fresh naan and let you know, but sounds like a good way to use frozen figs (always a bit slimy) without pulverizing them to death into sweet drinks. Might make a nice marmalade with onion and coriander, as well.

  3. Ttrockwood says:

    I’ve been loving these!! I add two semi defrosted figs, plain greek yogurt, a small gob of almond butter and some almond milk together for a great breakfast smoothie. I prefer fresh ones roasted with a drizzle of basalmic vinegar ontop of a cracker or added to a big salad.

  4. […] coconut milk ~1 cup of pineapple ~1 banana ~2 figs (I use Trader Joe’s Frozen Organic shown here) ~1 tsp of organic flax/chia […]

  5. […] figs. I don’t know what to do with them yet–they’re frozen with the skin on but this lady says I can blend ‘em right up that way, so it seems VERY […]

  6. Wendy C says:

    Apparently they have discontinued the frozen organic figs! I used them everyday in my smoothie and I cannot find them anywhere. WHY??????


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