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Trader Joe’s Kale Sprouts

Trader Joe's Kale Sprouts

Kale and Brussels sprouts – fused together? If it wasn’t such a good idea, it’d be terrifying.

We recently looked at the shocking explosion in popularity of the humble Brussels sprout. I myself have never considered myself much of a Brussels sprout man, although I’m occasionally tempted into the dish when sufficient quantities of bacon and cheese have been introduced. I’m also not much of a kale man, although I can occasionally be convinced to enjoy it chopped – if there’s enough good salad fixings to go with it. Why then, did I feel compelled to pick up a bag of Trader Joe’s Kale Sprouts – a product that is, somehow, exactly what it sounds like. Some twisted nutritional madman, in a decaying castle on some storm bitten crag, managed to fuse these two unfavorably regarded members of the Brassilica family into one lopsided ungainly form – perfect for haunting the dreams of obstinate children forever more. Surely this tinkering can’t work out well, can it?

Fortunately, I’ve matured far enough beyond my own childhood dislike of strange vegetables to actually give this unusual new plant a try. What I discovered was a veggie that combines the best of both its parents into a new form.

Despite owing it’s ancestry in half to Brussels sprouts, kale sprouts don’t look all that much like those infamous green buds. Instead, kale sprouts look like little heads of kale. In fact, kale sprouts are often referred to by their other name, lollipop kale – downplaying the Brussels sprouts side altogether. Don’t be fooled though – despite their very kale-like appearance if you saw kale sprouts at the farm, you’d see them growing off the sides of long, vertical stalks – exactly like Brussels sprouts.

Trader Joe's Kale Sprouts 2

Sauteed Kale Sprouts

This mixed pedigree is reflected in the taste – the kale sprout taste is almost exactly halfway between kale and Brussels sprouts. Robust, nutritious, crisp, fresh, and slightly bitter with a hint of pepperiness. As a result, you can cook them in any of the ways you would consider cooking either. Kale sprouts can be cut in half and roasted in the oven like Brussels sprouts just as easily as they can be sauteed with a touch of olive oil and salt, like kale – or simply thrown on a salad.

While I expected to be underwhelmed by these guys as a result of that “middle of the road” phenomenon, I was actually quite charmed by the little morsels. I hadn’t known it before, but I guess I’ve always wanted my Brussels sprouts to be leafier and my kale to have more body. Trader Joe’s Kale Sprouts manage to do both those things at the same time. It’s like they scratch an itch I didn’t know I had. In fact, I’d say I found them easier to cook, and friendlier to eat, than either of its progenitors.

Kale sprouts are an excellent addition to your produce pantry, and a versatile tool for many meals, from a hearty side for meat dishes, to an addition to your salad bowl, to a simple saute. Unlike so many produce hybrids that seem to be made exclusively for novelty purposes – like the saturn peach, or pluot – kale sprouts actually fill a meaningful role in the kitchen.  Let’s hope they’re here to stay.


The Breakdown

Would I Recommend It: Yes, they’re handy, novel and nutritious.

Would I Buy Them Again: I would – they made me feel fancy.

Final Synopsis: A kale/Brussels sprout hybrid that combines the best of two worlds.

 

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5 Comments on “Trader Joe’s Kale Sprouts”

  1. Ttrockwood says:

    How exciting these are at trader joe’s! I bought some from another market and loved them but they were terribly expensive. Novelty veggies are always fun to try!

  2. […] is quinoa with medium boiled egg, topped with local, seasonal veggies such as Brussel Sprouts and Kale Sprouts (her latest Trader Joe’s obsession), mushrooms, onions, sun-dried tomatoes, spinach, and garlic. […]

  3. Mara G. says:

    Yup – yummy stuff, though if I ate them raw I think I’d feel like I was chewing cud and have some interesting intestinal responses. Sauteed with garlic and olive oil to the point of chewiness but not mealiness (which they do get to if cooked too long), they’re a great side green.

  4. Carmen says:

    I just pan roasted them in the pork tenderloin drippings and dash of lemon infused olive oil. Tremendous!

  5. […] is quinoa with medium boiled egg, topped with local, seasonal veggies such as Brussel Sprouts and Kale Sprouts (her latest Trader Joe’s obsession), mushrooms, onions, sun-dried tomatoes, spinach, and garlic. […]


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